Snæfellsjökull – Snæfellsjökull Glacier

Snæfellsjökull – Snæfellsjökull Glacier

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Snæfellsjökull

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| km | +m
Snæfellsjökull 64.822334, -23.726845 This volcano is 1446 meters high and it is truly world-famous because it features prominently in the science fiction novel Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne (1864). Climbing it is easy but this takes some preparation, good weather and equipment.You approach Snæfellsjökull by the mountain road F570, either from route 574 near Arnarstapi in the south or from route 574 near Ólafsvík in the north. This mountain road F570 is not open all year, and typically opens up in early May and remains open to late September. However, this is dependent on weather. Route 570 is a rather rough gravel road, and it is called Jökulhálsvegur in Icelandic. Continue to “park” on the map and leave vehicle here to start the climb. This is a long but not difficult climb. It is over snow and ice and there is a danger of crevasses. It is essential to make the climb in a group, preferrably with climbing equipment suitable for travel over a glacier (crampons, ice axes, ropes, harness). Soon you leave the sand and gravel terain and start hiking over ice. The ice may be smooth and slippery, with open crevasses (mid- to late-summer) or it may still be covered by snow (spring and early summer). In either case, be very careful and pay attention to crevasses. You will usually see the tracks of a snowmobile on the glacier in the direction of the summit. It is a good idea to walk in these tracks, as they are generally avoiding the crevasses. Conditions for climbing are generally good right to the top, but visibility may vary and fog is common in the summit region. When you reach the summit region, you are basically at the eastern edge of a large and ice-filled crater. The highest peak on the crater´s rim, in the center, is Miðþúfa. It is a short but very steep climb up to the top of Miðþúfa and the peak is generally shrouded in ice, so proper climbing gear is essential to attempt it. Slightly lower is Norðurþúfa to the north. A third and lower peak, Vesturþúfa, occurs in the southwest. After you have taken in all the sights, then descend the same route to avoid crevasses. The latest eruption of Snæfellsjökull took place about 1700 years ago. But the volcano is still active and local earthquake activity occurs now at depths between 9 and 28 km below the volcano. (Directions)

This volcano is 1446 meters high and it is truly world-famous because it features prominently in the science fiction novel Journey to the Center of the Earth by Jules Verne (1864). Climbing it is easy but this takes some preparation, good weather and equipment.

You approach Snæfellsjökull by the mountain road F570, either from route 574 near Arnarstapi in the south or from route 574 near Ólafsvík in the north. This mountain road F570 is not open all year, and typically opens up in early May and remains open to late September. However, this is dependent on weather. Route 570 is a rather rough gravel road, and it is called Jökulhálsvegur in Icelandic. Continue to “park” on the map and leave vehicle here to start the climb. This is a long but not difficult climb. It is over snow and ice and there is a danger of crevasses. It is essential to make the climb in a group, preferrably with climbing equipment suitable for travel over a glacier (crampons, ice axes, ropes, harness). Soon you leave the sand and gravel terain and start hiking over ice. The ice may be smooth and slippery, with open crevasses (mid- to late-summer) or it may still be covered by snow (spring and early summer). In either case, be very careful and pay attention to crevasses. You will usually see the tracks of a snowmobile on the glacier in the direction of the summit. It is a good idea to walk in these tracks, as they are generally avoiding the crevasses. Conditions for climbing are generally good right to the top, but visibility may vary and fog is common in the summit region. When you reach the summit region, you are basically at the eastern edge of a large and ice-filled crater. The highest peak on the crater´s rim, in the center, is Miðþúfa. It is a short but very steep climb up to the top of Miðþúfa and the peak is generally shrouded in ice, so proper climbing gear is essential to attempt it. Slightly lower is Norðurþúfa to the north. A third and lower peak, Vesturþúfa, occurs in the southwest. After you have taken in all the sights, then descend the same route to avoid crevasses. The latest eruption of Snæfellsjökull took place about 1700 years ago. But the volcano is still active and local earthquake activity occurs now at depths between 9 and 28 km below the volcano.

Information

This is a long but not difficult climb. It is over snow and ice and there is a danger of crevasses. It is essential to make the climb in a group, preferrably with climbing equipment suitable for travel over a glacier (crampons, ice axes, ropes, harness).

Distance: 7,6 km

Elevation: 786 m

Duration: About 8 Hrs

Starting point: Road F570

GPS track (qpx file)